news
  • This site uses cookies and in some cases third-party cookies to provide a better service for users. When navigating or using our services you agree to our use of cookies.
  • The American Veterinary Medical Association has joined the Step It Up! effort backed by the National Park Service and the Surgeon General's Office to promote walking, pointing to the health benefits for humans and their four-legged companions.

  • Biodiversity scenarios are a useful tool to help policymakers predict how flora and fauna will likely respond to future environmental conditions. Although changes to land use are a major driver of biodiversity loss, scenarios focus overwhelmingly on climate change, a new study shows. The researchers say this imbalance makes scenarios less credible, and make recommendations for developing more plausible projections.

  • Eradication of invasive mammal species is a strategy used to help conserve biodiversity on islands and restore populations of native species. Researchers have now assessed the success of this strategy globally, highlighting the importance of controlling invasive species to protect biodiversity on islands and achieve global conservation targets.

  • Voluntary non-monetary conservation — where citizens implement actions without a financial incentive — is an emerging approach to biodiversity protection that could be applied in many countries and environments, a new study shows. This study makes recommendations for actions, such as being simple and affordable, and calls for conservation scientists to recognise their value as a complementary tool alongside traditional market-based and coercive approaches, such as payment for ecosystem services and national parks.

  • The effects of climate change and climate variability on forest ecosystems are evident around the world and further impacts are unavoidable, at least in the short to medium term. Addressing the challenges posed by climate change will require adjustments to forest policies and changes to forest management plans and practices.

  • The Forests and Water: a five-year action plan calls for the tangible integration of science, policy and practice related to forest-water interactions. It emerged from the discussions and recommendations of the Forests and Water Agenda, which would like to encourage greater engagement of stakeholders from around the world in the topic of forests and water.

  • The”Exposure to Greenness and Mortality in a Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study of Women” study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that people who live in “greener” areas, with more vegetation around, have a lower risk of mortality. The health benefits are likely thanks to factors such as improved mental health, social engagement and physical activity that come with living near green spaces.

  • We Love Cities is a social media campaign that allows people across the world to express support for sustainable urban development by voting on selected Earth Hour City Challeng cities and posting improvement suggestions for these cities.

  • In a world that is increasingly urban, we often overlook the importance of city parks as critical pieces of urban infrastructure. When hard-pressed city officials are balancing the demands of public safety, education, transportation, water, sanitation and homeless services with parks, it is easy to see why parks are often seen as a residual budget category.

  • The IUCN European Regional Office is pleased to invite you to the European Green Week event Making money through landscape restoration, How nature-based solutions can make the countryside thrive facilitated by the Belgian Biodiversity Platform on Tuesday 31 May 2016 at Belgian Science Policy Office in Brussels.

  • Many park visitors enjoy a walk in the woods, sometimes with a nature guide. But, two California state parks are offering a very different experience with guided forest therapy walks, which are recognized as a stress management activity.

  • The evidence that parks are important for our health, environments and well-being is well supported. To get these full benefits, however, people need to be able to access them. Many underserved communities lack this vital access to parks and green spaces which is why NRPA has launched the Safe Routes to Parks initiative. This campaign aims to implement environmental and policy strategies that create safe and equitable access to parks for all people.

  • This large Conference to be held in Orvieto, Italy, from 4th to 7th April 2017, will be a strategic event for the H2020 priority topic of the Nature Based Solutions and will bring together different communities besides to the GreenInUrbs one. Both DG Research and DG Environment of EC will be present at the event.

  • To keep Europe’s ecosystems healthy, we need to protect biodiversity. How can the ecosystem service approach help? And how can we capture people’s more deeply held values beyond mere money? Watch the short film about the different tools in the ecosystem services toolbox: or read the In-Depth Report on Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity.

  • One of UNEP’s goals is to help build the capacity of professionals to tackle current and future ecological problems. Now UNEP, in cooperation with Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, is launching a new course on ecosystems. The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Wicked Problems, Dynamic solutions: The Ecosystem Approach and Systems Thinking will be disseminated through GUPES.

  • EUROPARC is looking for a Communications Officer with a strong IT background, an interest in nature and a passion for parks. The Communications Officer will have opportunity to contribute directly to the work of a wide European environmental organisation, working along with an international team, so needs an understanding and willingness to work in a NGO culture.
  • The direct impact of urbanization on vegetation growth is a negative one: the more built-up an area is, the less greenery it has because buildings and pavement replace surface area covered by plants. But urbanization also has indirect effects on enhancing vegetation growth.

  • Environment-health research has shown significant relationships between the quantity of green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods and people’s stress levels. The focus of this paper is the nature of access to green space (i.e., its quantity or use) necessary before any health benefit is found.

  • This international forum, to be held at the Science Museum of Valladolid capital on 22 and 23 June, aims to be a meeting-point for researchers, urban managers and technicians to discuss recent advances in the field of efficiency on planting techniques for degraded urban areas and Mediterranean climate. It is also a forum for sharing knowledge about technical projects, policy initiatives and social participation around urban forests.

  • This study shows that since 1982, Earth has become greener in an area covering 36 million km2, close to two times the size of the United States. Above all, this seems to be the result of a fertilizing effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on plants. The study was carried out with satellite images which can capture this increase in terrestrial leaf area.

  • The 10th Congress for Environmental Education will take place on 23 June in Baden-Württemberg aiming to deepen the information exchange and the discussion in the fields on environmental and sustainability education. The detail program will be available in the mid of May.

  • The 2016 edition of Green Week, the biggest annual occasion to debate and discuss European environment policy, will take place from Monday, 30 May to Friday, 3 June in Brussels. It will focus on the theme "Investing for a greener future".

  • European society faces a growing range of health and social problems. This report presents a summary of the evidence on the challenges, the role that nature can play in addressing these challenges, what different stakeholders are doing and can do to build on the health-social-nature synergies and elements of a road map for a way forward.

events